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How to use Facebook to share information and engage Investors – Part 3

By   27 June 2013 No Comment

facebook-fan-engagement1Recently we began a series of posts dedicated to some of the most common practices of companies who are using Facebook for IR.  In part 1 we talked about how companies are emulating the look and feel of the corporate website homepage. In part 2 we shared examples of companies who are configuring an RSS feed to populate their Facebook pages. This week, in the final post in this series we talk about another common trend:

Use of multimedia to highlight aspects of the business

Many companies continue to make excellent use of various multimedia, repurposing content, photographs and video in several places, such as their IR website, YouTube and Facebook. When a company spends time, money and effort on corporate events or hosting and attending conferences, it is simply good practice to share it as much as possible.

Most public companies on Facebook add photos to regular posts and also maintain some kind of photo gallery. For example, Check Point Software included the following series of photographs in a post on their Facebook Timeline from one of their corporate events:

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 Check Point Software also has a photo gallery on their Facebook account, linking to albums from several things – conferences, roadshows, and other events:

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Facebook provides a generic photo gallery application (as with Check Point’s above), but for companies already using other photo sharing platforms like Flickr, Facebook also allows sharing of images through a special application. For example, Iberdrola uses a regular photo gallery, but also provides a link on Facebook to their Flickr account photographs:

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Other examples include:

Another commonly shared item via Facebook is video, but instead of simply posting a link to an external video, companies add an embedded one that Facebook readers can watch without leaving the web page. For instance, this one from Eastman Chemical Company, explaining the sustainability properties of their products, has a play arrow right in the post that if clicked plays the video immediately:

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The Eastman Chemical example above differs from a post like ALSTOM’s (below). Instead of embedding the video, they provide a link that takes a reader out of their place in the ALSTOM Facebook timeline to a different website:

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Another common type of video to share is an interview with a CEO/CFO commenting on their company’s strategy or providing additional context around their quarterly earnings or annual results. Syngenta has an example below:

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Or Cognizant’s sharing of an interview with their Vice-Chairman on the state of the IT industry:

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Henry Schein provides video of CEO Stanley Bergman’s comments on developments in the industry:

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Rather than simply sharing press releases on Facebook, some companies are including video to provide more context around the topic to readers. Fiserv, for instance, posted a link to their actual press release on a new product, and a video of the division president talking about launch. This practice can help strengthen relations with shareholders as it shows the company cares enough to take the time to ensure a clear understanding of what this means for them.  Additionally, providing additional information around an event can also alleviate potential repetitive questions to the IR department.

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Broadcom added an embedded video of an external party’s evaluation of their product performance. Adding this kind of external testimonial can help the company gain credibility.

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As we’ve mentioned in our research reports, companies that publish their corporate videos on YouTube and embed them on their website can be even more visible if they also provide access to the videos on their Facebook account. It allows readers quick access to the content and can increase readership across all channels. Additionally, companies that allow easier access to video make it much easier for interested parties – the financial media, or institutional and retail shareholders – to share the videos.